Morning thought

I say people never know what they are capable of until the situation arises. I found this to be true last night.
Months ago, I sat in a classroom, half-listening, and the only reason I sat there was because my bosses made me go. The instructor went over the material; she placed dummies on the ground, and then she handed out literature.
“I’ll try to keep it interesting,” she promised.
“The sooner we all get this down, the sooner we can all get out of here.”
At that point, most of the class stopped answering their emails from their cellular devices. We put our things away and then went over the necessary steps to learn and preform CPR.

We went over different scenarios; we did our own role play, and the teacher kept to her word. She made the subject interesting, and kept the class moving.
“I know what you’re all thinking,” she said. “You’re all wondering if you’ll remember this stuff…”

Last night, I boarded the train after another long shift at work. I found a seat and then wired music to my ears. As the train pulled out of Pennsylvania Station, I began to forget about the city. I was beginning to unwind and forget the stress of work. I was thinking about dinner and listening to The Pink Floyd.

The train was approximately 10 minutes west of Jamaica Station when I noticed a woman standing near the doors.  Rush hour is not always the kindest time. Seating is first come, first serve, and by the time this woman arrived on the 6:53 to Ronkokoma, all of the seats were taken.
The woman appeared healthy. She was well dressed, but perhaps dressed warmly. I noticed as she stepped backwards, as if to catch her balance. However, no one else seemed to notice. No one else caught her as she fell to the floor either.

I pulled the ear pieces from my ears, threw may bag from my lap, and rushed over. A group of men and women stood above the fallen girl. All of them looked down, and all of them asked, “Are you ok?”
“No,” said the woman. “I’m not.”
I could see fear in her eyes and her fear quickly became mine.

As I knelt beside her, two men tried to pick her up.
“DO NOT PICK HER UP!” I told them. “You don’t know why she went down.”

“Ma’am, I need you to lie still for a second.” I pointed to a man sitting in a seat nearby. “YOU, do you have a cell phone?”
“Yes, I do,” he answered.
I explained, “Good, I need you to call 911,” and I made sure he acknowledged me.

I pushed everyone that crowded the scene away, and fortunately, there was an EMT onboard. He rushed over, asked me to stay, and I did as I was told. But others are not as obedient, so naturally, they began to crowd the scene again.
I repeated very loudly, “I need you to get back. I don’t want anyone standing here!”
(That’s the good thing about my New York accent; it makes me sound tougher than I am)

“I feel better,” the woman promised. “I don’t know what happened….I guess I just fainted.”

After several questions from the Emergency Medical Technician, we picked her up and the EMT went to retrieve his bag. But as he went, I stood beside the woman. I noticed her eyes sort of vanish.
I asked, “Ma’am,” but she looked through me.
“Are you ok?”
As the woman fell into my arms, I laid her down on the floor.
I was glad she did not need CPR and I was happy she came back to consciousness.

As the train pulled into Jamaica Station, several officers waited by the doorway. What frustrated me is that no one on the train moved for a woman in distress. No one even offered their seat until a man said, “Someone should really let her sit down.”
What angered me is the callousness of others. I was furious as people thought they could step over the sick woman to exit the train…
But not on my watch

I kept thinking, “What if that was my mother? What if that was my wife, or my daughter?”
What kind of society have we become?

After the woman was taken to an ambulance, the train pulled out of Jamaica Station, and I sat down. After which, the EMT grabbed my arm and assured me, “You did a good job back there.”
A few others agreed, but I felt as if I were about to lose my head.

I’m not sure why I felt a surge of tears after I walked off the train. Perhaps it’s because I was able to pay back a piece of what I owe. Maybe it was just my adrenaline….maybe it was my disappointment with the lack of humanity from other passengers.
All I know is I learned more than I thought in that CPR class. I knew when to step in and when to step back.

I learned that I am more capable than I thought…

6 thoughts on “Morning thought

  1. i TO HAD TO STEP IN TO HELP A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO .MY GRAND CHILDREN HAD A FRIEND OVER TO VISIT AND PLAYING AROUND HE WAS 15 YRS THEY WERE SKATING DOWN THE DRIVE WAY TO THE CAR PARKED AT THE BOTTOM OF THE DRIVE WAY . THE BOY CAME OFF HIS BOARD AND SCALPED HIMSELF ON THE EXHAUST PIPE . THE KIDS BOUGHT HIM INSIDE TO ME AND SAID HE CUT HIS HEAD ,HIS HEAD WAS REALLY BAD I GOT A TOWEL AND TOLD HIM TO HOLD THE TOWEL HARD AND PUSH IT FORWARD AS THE SCALP HAD PEELED BACK ,I DID NOT TELL HIM HOW BAD HE WAS SO HE WOULD STAY CALM AN HE WAS SO GOOD. SO I SENT FOR HIS MOTHER WHO WAS DRUNK IN BED .I TOOK THEM MOTHER AND SON TO THE LOCAL HOSPITAL . I TOLD THE NURSE AND THE DR WHAT HAD HAPPENED BUT BECAUSE I WAS NOT A NURSE THEY DID NOT BELIEVE IT WAS SO BAD AS IT HAD STOPPED BLEEDING ,SO THEY LET HIM LAY THERE FOR 1 HR I KEPT TELLING THEM BUT NO RESPONSE . WHEN THE SURGEON CAME I TOLD HIM OUR STORY AND HE HAD A VERY CLOSE LOOK AND HE PUSHED IT A LITTLE AND IT CAME UP IN HIS HAND ,HE WAS SO ANGRY ABOUT IT AND NOT BEING CALL SOONER . HE OPERATED ON SHANE AND TOLD ME I HAD SAVED HIS LIFE THE WOUND HAD INSTANTLY KNITTED TOGETHER BECAUSE OF HOW I HAD TREATED THE BOY STRAIGHT AWAY BECAUSE HE WOULD HAVE BLED TO DEATH . I THANKED GOD I WAS THERE TO HELP HIM ,IT HAD BEEN 20 YRS SINCE I HAD DONE MY FIRST AID TRAINING .

  2. Great job ! makes me realize how much I hate humanity more and more each day !! The saying the more people I meet the more I love my dog lol !! Thank god for the few good ones left in the world !

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